To Do List After installing Ubuntu MATE 14.10 Utopic OS

Screenshot-1Ubuntu MATE 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Desktop Environment

Screenshot-2

Supported until June 2015

Tutorial updated on Tues. Nov. 11th., 2014.

Ubuntu MATE is a stable, easy-to-use operating system with a configurable desktop environment. Ideal for those who want the most out of their desktops, laptops and netbooks and prefer a traditional desktop metaphor. With modest hardware requirements it is suitable for modern workstations and older hardware alike. The MATE Desktop has a rich history and is the continuation of the GNOME2 desktop, which was the default desktop environment on many Linux and Unix operating systems for over a decade. This means that MATE Desktop is tried, tested and very reliable. While MATE Desktop provides the essential user interfaces to control and use a computer, Ubuntu MATE adds a collection of additional applications to turn your computer into a truly powerful workstation. The Ubuntu Software Center includes thousands of free applications suitable for just about any professional or recreational pursuit. MATE is under active development to add support for new technologies while preserving a traditional desktop experience. See the Roadmap or Stefano’s presentation at FOSDEM 2014 to find out more about how MATE has evolved and what is planned for the future. The MATE Manifesto outlines some of the principles that guide the project. Netflix now works out of the box via the latest Google Chrome stable and Steam is available for gaming enthusiasts.

Continue reading

To Do List After installing Linux Mint 17 OS

xfce

Supported until April 2019

Tutorial updated on Tues. Nov. 11th., 2014.

Linux Mint is a Linux distribution for desktop computers, based on Ubuntu or Debian. Linux Mint is aimed at being a “modern, elegant and comfortable operating system which is both powerful and easy to use.” Mint provides full out-of-the-box multimedia support by including some proprietary software such as Java and Adobe Flash. Mint’s motto is “from freedom came elegance”. No more viruses, no more spyware/malware, and Ubuntu-based Linux Mint OS is free. Netflix now works out of the box via the latest Google Chrome stable and Steam is available for gaming enthusiasts.

Continue reading

To Do List After installing Fedora 20 OS

Screenshot-from-2014-01-07-142631Fedora Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2014-02-24 12:24:43Fedora Classic Gnome Desktop Environment

screenshot-from-2012-04-28-095831Fedora  (Gnome 2) Mate Desktop Environment

Tutorial Updated on: Wed. Sept. 10th., 2014.

Fedora is an operating system based on the Linux kernel, developed by the community-supported Fedora Project and owned by Red Hat. The Fedora Project’s mission is to lead the advancement of free and open source software and content as a collaborative community. Fedora uses the RPM package management system.

Fedora contains software distributed under a free and open source license and aims to be on the leading edge of such technologies. Fedora developers prefer to make upstream changes instead of applying fixes specifically for Fedora—this ensures that their updates are available to all Linux distributions. The Fedora Project is governed by a board whose majority is elected by the Fedora community.

Continue reading

To Do List After installing Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr OS

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:49:12Ubuntu 14.04 Unity Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-10-09 10:05:09Ubuntu 14.04 Classic “Flashback” Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:53:56Ubuntu 14.04 Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 23:00:49Ubuntu 14.04 Cairo Desktop (Gnome Environment)

Supported until April 2019

Tutorial updated on Tues. Nov. 11th., 2014.

Ubuntu is designed primarily for use on personal computers, although a server edition also exists. As of 2012, according to online surveys, Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution on desktop/laptop personal computers, and most Ubuntu coverage focuses on its use in that market. In January 2012, the people at Ubuntu estimated that 20 million people use their operating system. However, it is also popular on servers and for cloud computing. No more viruses, no more spyware/malware, and Ubuntu OS is free. Netflix now works out of the box via the latest Google Chrome stable and Steam is available for gaming enthusiasts.

Continue reading

To Do List After installing Ubuntu 12.04.5 LTS Precise Pangolin OS

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:49:12Ubuntu 12.04 Unity Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-10-09 10:05:09Ubuntu 12.04 Classic “Flashback” Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:53:56Ubuntu 12.04 Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 23:00:49Ubuntu 12.04 Cairo Desktop (Gnome Environment)

Supported until April 2017

Tutorial Updated on: Wed. Sept. 10th., 2014.

Ubuntu is designed primarily for use on personal computers, although a server edition also exists. Ubuntu holds an estimated global usage of more than 12 million desktop users, making it the most popular desktop Linux distribution with about 50% of Linux desktop marketshare. In January 2012, the people at Ubuntu estimated that 20 million people use their operating system. It is fourth most popular on web servers, though its popularity is increasing rapidly. No more viruses, and no more spyware/malware. This guide was created primarily to help new Ubuntu users transition quickly over from other operating systems, but is just as useful to even very experienced Linux users. When you are done installing everything on this list hopefully you will have everything you would probably find on other comparable commercially available operating systems. There was a step-by-step list written for Fedora many many years ago when I was first starting out learning about Linux OS and was the concept for this guide, and I always found this to be best way to do fresh installations of Linux on my own computers. Netflix now works out of the box via the latest Google Chrome stable and Steam is available for gaming enthusiasts.

Continue reading

To Do List After installing Crunchbang Stable Debian Linux OS

Screenshot - 02102013 - 08:31:46 PMScreenshot - 02102013 - 08:30:39 PMScreenshot - 02102013 - 08:36:13 PMDebian Linux Openbox Desktop Environment

Tutorial Updated on: Fri. Nov. 7th., 2014.

CrunchBang is a Debian GNU/Linux based distribution offering a great blend of speed, style and substance. Using the nimble Openbox window manager, it is highly customizable and provides a modern, full-featured GNU/Linux system without sacrificing performance. It is a rolling-release which is a continually developing software system; this is instead of the standard release development model which uses software versions that must be periodically reinstalled over the previous version.

The primary aim of the CrunchBang project is to produce a stable distribution offering the best possible out-of-the-box Openbox experience. To achieve this goal, CrunchBang pulls many base packages directly from Debian’s repositories, which are well-known for providing stable and secure software. Packages from CrunchBang’s own repositories are then customized and pinned to the system to produce what is known as the CrunchBang distro. You can install other desktop environments if you don’t wish to use Openbox, i.e. Gnome, KDE, etc. And because it is Linux OS you won’t have to worry about spyware or viruses.

Netflix now works out of the box via the latest Google Chrome stable and Steam is available for gaming enthusiasts.

Continue reading

Installing Gnome 3 on Ubuntu

Ubuntu Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

If you are reading this article, chances are that you have tried the Unity interface on Ubuntu. Although Canonical has done a great job with the development of Unity, some of us still prefer to use Gnome as a default GUI. In addition, the Gnome team has also done an excellent job improving Gnome and released this as Gnome 3. Since Gnome 3 comes with both the classic (similar to Gnome 2) and the new Gnome 3 interface, I decided to focus on installing Gnome 3 in this article.

Continue reading