To Do List After installing Linux Mint 17 OS

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Supported until April 2019

Linux Mint is a Linux distribution for desktop computers, based on Ubuntu or Debian. Linux Mint is aimed at being a “modern, elegant and comfortable operating system which is both powerful and easy to use.” Mint provides full out-of-the-box multimedia support by including some proprietary software such as Java and Adobe Flash. Mint’s motto is “from freedom came elegance”.

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To Do List After installing Fedora 20 OS

Screenshot-from-2014-01-07-142631Fedora Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2014-02-24 12:24:43Fedora Classic Gnome Desktop Environment

screenshot-from-2012-04-28-095831Fedora  (Gnome 2) Mate Desktop Environment

Updated: May 25th 2014.

Fedora is an operating system based on the Linux kernel, developed by the community-supported Fedora Project and owned by Red Hat. The Fedora Project’s mission is to lead the advancement of free and open source software and content as a collaborative community. Fedora uses the RPM package management system.

Fedora contains software distributed under a free and open source license and aims to be on the leading edge of such technologies. Fedora developers prefer to make upstream changes instead of applying fixes specifically for Fedora—this ensures that their updates are available to all Linux distributions.

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To Do List After installing Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr OS

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:49:12Ubuntu 14.04 Unity Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-10-09 10:05:09Ubuntu 14.04 Classic “Flashback” Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:53:56Ubuntu 14.04 Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 23:00:49Ubuntu 14.04 Cairo Desktop (Gnome Environment)

Supported until April 2019

Ubuntu is designed primarily for use on personal computers, although a server edition also exists. As of 2012, according to online surveys, Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution on desktop/laptop personal computers, and most Ubuntu coverage focuses on its use in that market. In January 2012, the people at Ubuntu estimated that 20 million people use their operating system. However, it is also popular on servers and for cloud computing. No more viruses, no more spyware/malware, and Ubuntu OS is free.

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To Do List After installing Ubuntu 12.04.4 LTS Precise Pangolin OS

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:49:12Ubuntu 12.04 Unity Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-10-09 10:05:09Ubuntu 12.04 Classic “Flashback” Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 22:53:56Ubuntu 12.04 Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

Screenshot from 2013-09-21 23:00:49Ubuntu 12.04 Cairo Desktop (Gnome Environment)

Supported until April 2017

Last time this page was link-checked and completely updated: November 2013

Ubuntu is designed primarily for use on personal computers, although a server edition also exists. Ubuntu holds an estimated global usage of more than 12 million desktop users, making it the most popular desktop Linux distribution with about 50% of Linux desktop marketshare. In January 2012, the people at Ubuntu estimated that 20 million people use their operating system. It is fourth most popular on web servers, though its popularity is increasing rapidly. No more viruses, and no more spyware/malware. This guide was created primarily to help new Ubuntu users transition quickly over from other operating systems, but is just as useful to even very experienced Linux users. When you are done installing everything on this list hopefully you will have everything you would probably find on other comparable commercially available operating systems. There was a step-by-step list written for Fedora many many years ago when I was first starting out learning about Linux OS and was the concept for this guide, and I always found this to be best way to do fresh installations of Linux on my own computers.

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To Do List After installing Crunchbang Stable Debian Linux OS

Screenshot - 02102013 - 08:31:46 PMScreenshot - 02102013 - 08:30:39 PMScreenshot - 02102013 - 08:36:13 PMDebian Linux Openbox Desktop Environment

Updated: May 25th 2014.

CrunchBang is a Debian GNU/Linux based distribution offering a great blend of speed, style and substance. Using the nimble Openbox window manager, it is highly customizable and provides a modern, full-featured GNU/Linux system without sacrificing performance.

The primary aim of the CrunchBang project is to produce a stable distribution offering the best possible out-of-the-box Openbox experience. To achieve this goal, CrunchBang pulls many base packages directly from Debian’s repositories, which are well-known for providing stable and secure software. Packages from CrunchBang’s own repositories are then customized and pinned to the system to produce what is known as the CrunchBang distro.

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Installing Gnome 3 on Ubuntu

Ubuntu Gnome 3 Desktop Environment

If you are reading this article, chances are that you have tried the Unity interface on Ubuntu. Although Canonical has done a great job with the development of Unity, some of us still prefer to use Gnome as a default GUI. In addition, the Gnome team has also done an excellent job improving Gnome and released this as Gnome 3. Since Gnome 3 comes with both the classic (similar to Gnome 2) and the new Gnome 3 interface, I decided to focus on installing Gnome 3 in this article.

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To Do List After installing Ubuntu 10.04.4 Lucid LTS

Ubuntu 10.04.3 Lucid LTS Gnome 2 Desktop Environment

Supported until May 2015

Last time this page was link-checked and completely updated: October 2013

Special note: If your hardware is later than 2010/11 you probably are better off going with Ubuntu 12.04 or higher due to the lack of kernel firmware updates. If it is earlier than 2010/11 it will probably run faster with 10.04 LTS.

Ubuntu is designed primarily for use on personal computers, although a server edition also exists. As of 2012, according to online surveys, Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution on desktop/laptop personal computers, and most Ubuntu coverage focuses on its use in that market. In January 2012, the people at Ubuntu estimated that 20 million people use their operating system. However, it is also popular on servers and for cloud computing. No more viruses, no more spyware/malware, and Ubuntu OS is free.

Ubuntu is sponsored by the UK-based company Canonical Ltd. Canonical generates revenue by selling technical support and services related to Ubuntu, while the operating system itself is entirely free of charge.

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